Monthly Archives: July 2016

Home and Hospice

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cat, cats, petsMost of us have to wait anxiously at some point while our beloved pet goes through surgery. It may be merely a routine spaying or neutering, or something more serious. It feels great to know everything went well and that your pet is healing. Then, it’s your turn to make certain the healing continues. Your vet will let you know what to do in order to take care of your recuperating cat, dog, or other pet. Whatever needs to be done, your vet and technicians can help.

Your pet may need to spend more time recuperating at the clinic. Once home, if your pet was under anesthesia, she may still be drowsy. Try to keep your pet calm in a quiet, comfortable place. Avoid strenuous play time, and settle for comforting down time. Your vet may want you to be more strict about this and place your pet in a carrier, or some other container to prevent movement. You can make this comfortable for her, though she may resist at first. Make sure there is proper food, water, and a way for your pet to relieve herself.

Your dog or cat may need to urinate or defecate more often as a result of fluids, or medications. If you need to restrict activity, only let them out when necessary. There may be food restrictions, as well. Follow your vet’s feeding advice carefully. It may mean less food, more water, or a special type of food. Also follow the medication administration to the letter.

Keep a watchful eye on stitches and wounds. Noticeable heat, discharge, or odors are potential problems and should be reported to your vet. Ask your vet if you may keep the area clean with a gentle swab of disinfectant from time to time. If a chew collar was given to you, make sure it stays on, as some pets will try their hardest to remove it.

It’s always a little stressful when your pet undergoes surgery and is healing. At Pet Vet Hospitals, we do everything we can to make sure your pet gets back up and playing as soon as possible.

Healthy Heart: Heartworms and Your Pet

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bulldog lying down pantingWe all know that heartworms are a possibility for our pets. How much do we know, however, about what we’re trying to prevent in our pets?

Heartworms are caused by Dirofilaria immitis, a type of roundworm. These worms are spread via mosquitoes carrying the larvae. Humid, tropical areas and any outdoor time may put dogs and other pets at risk. These worms make their way through the body to the heart and lungs. The process can take time, and so symptoms may not appear until long after infection. Infections can be mild or severe, and are more likely in some states in comparison to others. This rather common problem is preventable and treatable.

There are levels of infestation. Class I is very mild and may present no symptoms, or little more than a cough, while Class II pets will cough and be sluggish. Severe cases present with sluggishness, anemia, fainting, and heart failure. If your vet thinks that heartworms might be present in your dog or pet, she will look for heart problems with an electrocardiograph. She may also test urine, perform X-rays, and more.

If a dog is infected, he will need hospitalization and treatment to kill the infection. You may also have to administer monthly treatments at home. If the worms have grown significantly, then surgery may be necessary to extract the worms.

When recovering, your pet should be inactive to prevent strain on the heart. A special diet may be necessary, too. He will need regular testing to make certain the problem is dissipating, and not recurring; re-infestation, or resistant infestation is a possibility, particularly for older dogs.

The first step to dealing with heartworms is to prevent them. Regular, monthly medication should be administered to prevent infestation from beginning. You can even purchase prevention medication that is also your regular flea prevention, all in one treatment. To find out what is best for your pet, contact us as Pet Vet Animal Hospitals today.

 

Safe this Summer with Your Pet

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Get your pet flee protection today.Summer fun is upon us. Pools are opening, children are out of school, and vacations have begun. Your pet wants to enjoy this time with you, too. So, as you play it safe with your family and friends this summer, do the same with your pet.

Keep it Cool

Heatstroke is a very real possibility. When you take your dog outside, make sure there is plenty of water nearby to help keep him cool. Don’t stay in the sun too long with him, either. If your dog has light fur and skin, some sunscreen may be a good idea, too. Talk to your vet about sunscreen for pets.

Never, ever leave your animal in a hot car, even with the windows down. Make sure your indoor pet has ways to keep cool, too. If you’re comfortable, you pet will mostly likely be, too, but watch for signs of overheating, just in case. If your pet is panting excessively, unstable, or drinking excessively, do what it takes to cool him down, or take him to the vet.

Protection

It’s important to maintain your pet’s vaccinations and medications all year ‘round, summer included. The hot months often mean time outdoors where the fleas and mosquitoes wait. These pests can make their way indoors, too. Protect all your pets from fleas, mosquitoes and heartworms, and any other prevention that your vet may recommend.

Keep your dog on a leash anywhere without fences, and with other dogs. Keep your eye on all your pets. Watch for potential predators or any accidents, such as those during swimming, that may occur.

At Pet Vet Hospitals, we want our clients happy and healthy so that they can enjoy every moment with you, their friend. Come see us and let us make certain that your pet is safe and ready for a fantastic summer with you.

Hurricane Pets

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dog-237187_1280Our hurricane season has begun. If you live near the coast, you are probably familiar with emergency planning for your home, neighborhood, and city. You, your house, and your escape plan aren’t the only things of which to think. Your pets should be part of your plans, as well. Though weather services track weather patterns that may result in hurricanes for some time, things can still happen quite suddenly.

Whatever you need to travel safely and comfortably with your pet, have it ready. Set the items (carrier, etc.) where you can get to them easily and quickly. Keep some extra food and emergency kit items ready for travel, just as you would for yourself, and know where pets fit into your vehicle with your other essentials so you can load fast.

Keep up with all vaccinations and healthcare, and microchip your pet. In emergency situations, you never know where you and your pet may end up. If you board your pet during an emergency, they will need the up-to-date information. If your pet is separated from you, you want anyone who finds him to know he’s vaccinated and safe to handle, and how to get in touch with you, and you want to be able to find him. It’s best to keep ID tags on regularly, but in case your pet does not wear a collar at all times, keep it and the tags ready.

Finally, one of the most important things you can do is be calm. Whether you stay in and ride out the storm, or you leave town, prepare for your pet as much as you prepare for yourself. At Pet Vet Hospitals, we’re accustomed to hurricane emergency planning, and we can help you make certain your pet is healthy, up-to-date on all vaccinations, and ready to be safe with you during hurricane season.