Monthly Archives: March 2017

Your Pet’s Cuts and Scrapes

By | Pet Care | No Comments

bulldog lying down pantingNo matter how much you protect your pets, you cannot stop everything. They will find ways to get into things they shouldn’t, or have accidents. A pet with a cut or scrape is common. This doesn’t necessarily warrant a trip to the vet, however. There are some tips to treating your pet’s cuts and scrapes at home, and know when it’s time to see the vet.

Examine the wound.

Start by being calm and speaking gently and soothingly to your pet. If necessary, ask someone to help you hold her. Inspect the wound carefully. It’s best if you use some gloves for this and it may help to have a cotton ball, or cloth to dab at blood so that you can see better. How deep is the wound? Is there anything inside it? If it is very deep and might need stitches, it’s best to see the vet. If there is something inside it, you might be able to extract it yourself gently with tweezers. If you’re very uncomfortable with that, there’s always the vet to help.

Wash and dry the area.

Clean debris and blood away gently with warm water and an antiseptic solution. Chlorhexidine is a common, easy-to-find solution that works well. Once you’ve rinsed the area clean, pat it dry.

Apply an ointment.

To help a wound heal, apply an antimicrobial ointment, just as you would on yourself. Something with neomycin is usually safe. If you’re unsure of what to use, ask your vet.

Dress it carefully.

Animals are known to chew at wounds. So, it’s important to make sure they’re covered. This can get a little difficult if the wound is in a hard-to-wrap place. If your pet is persistent about the licking and chewing, try a cone to prevent them from doing so. Leave the dressing on for a long while. You should change it at least once a day. Give the wound a chance to air out for a little while between changing bandages if you can.

Is it large and bleeding heavily?

If the wound is sizeable and bleeding significantly, don’t wait. Bandage it quickly—and safely—and head straight for the vet’s office. Whether your pet needs treatment for an injury, or need to know how to treat one at home, we’re here for you at Pet Vet Animal Hospitals.

When Bathing Your Pet

By | Pet Care | No Comments

wellness spa wash sponge dogThe internet is full of videos of pets relaxing in the bath. The truth is, however, that many a pet hates taking a bath. They fight and cry, and make the task a hated one for you, too. However, it is a necessary chore and there are better ways to get it done.

First, it’s important not to bathe too often. Your animal’s coat and skin have natural oils to keep them healthy. If you wash too much, you remove those healthy oils and your pet’s skin may become dry and itchy. Talk to your vet about precisely how often you should give your pet a bath.

When you choose a soap, select something gentle. If you’ve never really had trouble with your pet’s skin and fur—she’s never shown signs of allergies—then selecting a safe, natural wash should be easy. If your pet has a history of itchy skin, you may want to look into soaps formulated for pets with allergies. You can also talk to your vet about what you should use.

When it comes to the bath itself, try these tips:

  • Come bath time, start with a good brushing. This will reduce the amount of fur that comes off in the water.
  • Warm water—not hot or cold—is best.
  • Avoid getting your pet’s ears wet. Wet inner ears can get infected.
  • Stay calm if your pet resists. If you react to your pet’s fighting, it will only make the stress of the situation worse. Speak softly and soothingly, and be gentle. Sometimes holding him gently by the scruff will help still him.
  • Use a towel for dripping moisture, and then let them dry naturally. A hair dryer is often too hot and can cause excessively dry skin.

Hopefully, over time your pet will adjust to the process. If you have any questions about bathing your pet, or any other type of care, contact us at Pet Vet Hospitals.

Healthy Spring in Your Pet’s Step: Spring Health

By | Pet Care | No Comments

Spring brings warmer weather. This means more time outside with your dog enjoying sunny days. Of course, a change in seasons also brings new things that could be concerns for you and your pet. This spring, prepare and leave yourself more time to enjoy the season.

newsletter-banner

Allergies

People aren’t the only ones who experience sneezing, watery eyes, and sinus problems. The bloom and burst of pollen can cause much the same symptoms in dogs and cats. Your pets may exhibit signs like watery eyes, sneezing, coughing, licking, and excessive scratching. Some things can be treated at home. You can try a calming bath with special soap for itchiness. Some allergy symptoms can be treated at home with Benadryl—always be sure to ask a vet.

Growing Things

For outdoor pets, new plant life poses more than a risk for allergies. Some plants are poisonous if ingested. There are also insecticides and herbicides that, though they’re helpful for the lawn and garden, can be harmful for pets. Store these things away from your pets, and be aware of what your pet is doing when he’s outside. Avoid planting toxic things and try to use natural plant treatments.

Opening Doors and Windows

We like to let a fresh breeze cool the house on nice days, or days when it’s hot and we don’t want to overuse the air conditioner. Your cat or dog may enjoy this chance to smell the air, and see what’s happening outdoors. Make sure that you leave screens shut so that they don’t get out, and to prevent problems like mosquitoes from getting in.

Pest Control

The burst of spring brings bugs. It’s time to make sure your pets are up-to-date on all of their preventatives—heartworm, flea, tick, and mosquito. If your dog or cat lives outside most, or all of the time, consult with your veterinarian about the best protective plan for what lives in your area.

We’re ready for spring at Pet Vet Hospitals. Bring your furry family in for a spring health checkup and a plan to enjoy the season, while still remaining safe.