Monthly Archives: July 2017

Summer Pet Safety Tips

By | Pet Care | No Comments

bulldog lying down pantingSummer is in full swing, and like any time of the year, it has its fun elements and risks. As you enjoy your summer with your family and pets, don’t forget to implement some safety precautions to extend the fun. Your pets need your help staying safe.

Never leave a pet in the car.

Social media has made sure we know how terrible it is to leave a pet in a hot car. Even with the windows rolled down, the heat can reach fatal heights. Your pet could suffer heat exhaustion, or suffocate if the windows are rolled up, or merely cracked. Never, ever leave your pet in a hot car. If you cannot take him in with you, leave him at home where it’s cool while you run your errand.

Keep extra water out.

Water evaporates more quickly when the heat is up. Even if your pet is not outdoors, things can get a bit warmer inside, particularly if you’re trying not to overrun your air conditioner. Put some extra water out during the summer. Adding some ice to it, too, is helpful; it not only cools the water, but helps delay evaporation.

Keep pets away from outdoor cooking areas.

Fun in the sun is great for everyone, but if you’re cooking outside with people, your dog may make it a little difficult. Keep your pet away from the fire and utensils. You can do so by making sure he has plenty to occupy him. If there’s no one to play with him, make sure he has toys. Give him his own treats so that he’ll be a little less tempted to go after your food. If you must, put him away in another part of the yard, or in the house.

Add extra mosquito protection.

Mosquitoes are hard to control. Even when you make sure your pet is up to date on heartworm prevention, the mosquitoes can still bite. Add some extra defense for your pets. Try some pet-friendly mosquito spray, or place some pet-safe mosquito deterrent near your pet’s chosen areas.

Have safe fun this summer. If you need any advice, your help with your pet’s health, come see us at Pet Vet Hospitals.

Summer Heat Stress on Your Pets

By | Pet Care | No Comments

dog-237187_1280Summer is well on its way. Things are heating up, including your pets. We know how to handle the heat for ourselves, but our pets sometimes need our help. We provide for them—food, water, shelter, and comfort—and so they depend on us to keep them from being overcome by dangers like heat. As summer approaches, remember to take some extra precautions.

Have water everywhere—or, at least readily available.

Water evaporates faster when it’s hot. That means that your pet’s water bowl might need to be refilled more often. It’s a good idea to add another water bowl or two for your pet during summer to prevent dehydration, or even a little extra thirst. You can also put ice in the water. This will help keep things cool, and when the ice melts, it will replace evaporating water and keep the bowl full just a little longer. If your pet likes ice, give him or her a piece every now and then. It’s a great way to keep them occupied, cool, and hydrated. If you go out, take cool water with you, or make sure you know where water is available.

Turn on the air.

Let your pets enjoy the benefits of cooling systems you use. In severe heat, bring your pets inside where it’s cool. If your dog is outdoors, try adding an outdoor fan. Keep bedding and other things in comfortable, shaded areas; shade decreases summer temperatures significantly.

Know the signs of dehydration and heat stress.

If you’re not paying attention, dehydration and heat-related illness can seem to hit suddenly. Those signs may include:

  • Panting
  • Dizziness
  • Drooling
  • Rapid Heart Rate
  • Lack of Urine
  • And More

Knowing the signs can help you stop heat stress or stroke before it starts. Prepare, prevent, and treat. If you need help, come to us at Pet Vet Hospitals. We’re happy to help you and your pet get through the summer and the rest of the year, as well.

The Whining Dog

By | Dogs | No Comments

dog, dogs, allergies, petsWhile dogs can be wonderful, life-changing pets, they can also have their own quirks and problems. Many issues can be resolved with time, effort, and patience; your dog needs all of these from you in order to get better. Problems may include health or behavioral problems, or a mixture of both. Whining is something that all dogs do at some time; excessive, or constant whining, however, is stressful and could be a sign of a larger problem.

Whining is, like most other canine actions, a type of communication. Unfortunately for us, we don’t really speak a dog’s language, and so we cannot know exactly what he’s trying to say. If your dog is whining incessantly, and you’ve ruled out illness, pain, and other easily-addressed problems, it may be time to consider that the whining stems from more complex problems.

Anxiety

Does your dog pace when he whines? Does his whining increase, or become barking and howling when there’s a storm, a loud noise, or when you leave? Does he urinate and defecate on things? These are classic signs of canine anxiety and easing that anxiety can be a difficult process.

Some dogs merely need some extra training. They can learn that being calm and quiet has rewards, that an owner leaving is nothing to fear, and neither is being alone in general. They need to spend time alone regularly and get used to it, and be rewarded for doing so well.

Others may need more complex help, such as a combination of medication and training. Severe anxiety that manifests as whining could mean neurological problems. If you have tried all you know to try, it may be time to see your vet and ask about medication. Meds may help, but they won’t work alone; you’ll still have to train your dog, the medication may make it easier to do so.

If your dog’s whining is driving you crazy and you’ve done what you know to do, come see us at Pet Vet Hospitals. We may be able to help you figure out the next step.