Shelter vs. Home: What to Consider when Adopting a Shelter Pet

By May 16, 2016 Pet Care No Comments

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Getting a new pet is exciting. However, it’s important to remember that being ready to truly love an animal and making it part of your family may mean some extra work. It’s a misconception that adopting from a shelter means adopting a problem pet; but being left in a shelter can be painful for an animal, and they need some extra love and care.

Behavior

Pets are left at shelters for many reasons, the most common being:

  • Owners moved to an apartment that doesn’t allow pets.
  • Pet grew and the owner could no longer take care of it.
  • Owner discovers he or she has an allergy.
  • Divorce, breakups, and other personal problems.

Often, the pet’s behavior has nothing to do with being left. However, it is a huge adjustment to make, being left at a shelter, particularly for an older pet. Then, being adopted and adjusting to a new home and people is yet another big change. If you’re considering adoption, remember that it may take some time for your pet to grow accustomed to you and surroundings. She or he may show anxiety through bodily functions, chewing, howling and crying, or more. Your vet can help you figure out how to deal with this behavior, and let you know what to do if it doesn’t improve.

Costs

Many shelters have low adoptions fees. While it’s not the same as getting a free pet, you are paying for basic services that may cost you more if you paid a vet directly, and you know you are getting a pet that needs a good home. However, it’s important to remember that these fees may not cover everything, and you may need to take your pet in for a checkup immediately. Shelters cannot always provide all vaccines and procedures, so you may be in for some extra costs.

It is entirely worth it, though. You’ll still pay less than you would for a free pet, and many shelters work with local vets to offer you a special deal on checkups and any issues found at the first visit.

If you’re considering adopting a shelter pet, you’re on the right track for pet ownership. Though shelter pets sometimes take more adjustment time, and you may still need to shoulder some costs, your pet will help make your house a home in return. Let us at Pet Vet Hospitals help you and your pet get ready for a new life together.